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Jeanie_Deans-31862.jpg
PS Jeanie Deans634 viewsThe paddle steamer Jeanie Deans in Loch Long. Built by Fairfield at Govan and launched in 1931, she was extensively refitted after war service. She remained a passenger favourite on cruises from Craigendoran until the end of the 1964 season. The next year she went to the Thames and was renamed 'Queen of the South'. She was broken up in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1967.
Jeanie_Deans-21891.jpg
PS Jeanie Deans610 viewsThe paddle steamer Jeanie Deans was built by Fairfield at Govan and launched in 1931, then extensively refitted after war service. She remained a passenger favourite on cruises from Craigendoran until the end of the 1964 season. The next year she went to the Thames and was renamed 'Queen of the South'. She was broken up in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1967.
PS-Jeanie-Deans5311.jpg
PS Jeanie Deans469 viewsThe popular paddle steamer Jeanie Deans, circa 1933. She was built by Fairfield at Govan and launched in 1931, then extensively refitted after war service. She remained a passenger favourite on cruises from Craigendoran until the end of the 1964 season. The next year she went to the Thames and was renamed 'Queen of the South'. She was broken up in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1967.
Jeanie_Deans058.jpg
PS Jeanie Deans378 viewsA packed Jeanie Deans pictured shortly after leaving Craigendoran Pier in 1954. The paddle steamer was built by Fairfield at Govan and launched in 1931, then extensively refitted after war service. She remained a passenger favourite on cruises from Craigendoran until the end of the 1964 season. The next year she went to the Thames and was renamed 'Queen of the South'. She was broken up in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1967.
PS_Industry301.jpg
PS Industry317 viewsThis painting shows the early Clyde Shipping Company paddle steamer Industry in 1815. It appeared on a postcard published in 1990 to mark 175 years of the company and Glasgow being European City of Culture. Launched in 1814, she became the seventh steamboat to service the Clyde, mainly carrying luggage and cargo between Greenock and Glasgow, but also serving as one of the Clyde’s first tugs. Her career spanned over half a century and prior to her retirement she was the oldest steamer operating on the Clyde.
PS_Columba11.jpg
PS Columba414 viewsBuilt in 1878 by J. & G.Thomson at Clydebank, the 602-ton Columba is regarded as the most famous and luxurious Clyde steamer. An early steel-hulled vessel and at 301 feet, the largest Clyde steamer of her time, she operated the Glasgow to Ardrishaig service as part of MacBraynes 'Royal Route' to Oban. Reboilered in 1900, she was sold after the 1935 season, and broken up at Dalmuir. She is pictured off Gourock. Image date unknown.
Chancellor-steamer136~2.jpg
PS Chancellor332 viewsThe 272-ton paddle steamer Chancellor, built by R.Chambers, Dumbarton, for the Loch Goil and Loch Long Steamboat Company for the Arrochar service. Sold in 1901 to interests at Ferrol, Spain, and renamed Commercio.
PS_Caledonia_at_Ayr2652.jpg
PS Caledonia472 viewsThe paddle steamer Caledonia, seen leaving Ayr in the 1960s, was launched on February 1 1934 by Wm. Denny & Bros. Ltd. at Dumbarton. The 624-ton vessel served as a minesweeper named HMS Goatfell during the Second World War. After being based at Ayr, she replaced the Jeanie Deans at Craigendoran. After 1969, renamed Old Caledonia, she served as a Bass Charrington floating pub moored on the Embankment in central London, until badly damaged by fire in 1980, then was scrapped.
Lucy_Ashton,_Jeanie_Deans.jpg
Popular paddlers294 viewsA 1948 view of two of the most popular steamers at their base at Craigendoran Pier, the Lucy Ashton and the Jeanie Deans.
Marmion.jpg
P.S. Marmion426 viewsLaunched on May 5 1906 at A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow, the 403 ton Marmion was used on the Craigendoran to Arrochar and Loch Goil service for the North British Steam Packet Company. She was requisitioned for mineweeping at Dover from 1915 as HMS Marmion II, and returned to regular Clyde service in 1926. Again she was requisitioned for war service, stationed at Harwich. After surviving the Dunkirk evacuation, she was sunk by enemy bombers at Harwich on April 8 1941 and was later raised and scrapped.
Steamer_map.jpg
Map card408 viewsA map card showing the MacBrayne steamer PS Columba and a map of the Firth of Clyde, circa 1902.
Maid_of_the_Loch2521.jpg
Maid of the Loch428 viewsThe paddle steamer Maid of the Loch leaving Inversnaid for a cruise to the head of Loch Lomond in June 1968. The 555-ton vessel was the last paddle steamer built in Britain, and the last of a long line of Loch Lomond steamers beginning about 1816. Built by A. & J.Inglis of Glasgow, she was dismantled, shipped by rail to Balloch, reassembled, and launched on March 5 1953. Her last commercial sailing was in August 1981, and now she is looked after at Balloch Pier by the Maid Preservation Society.
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