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Last additions - Transport — Steamers
waverley-2012-w.jpg
Waverley 201258 viewsHelensburgh photographer Brian Averell took this stunning image of the paddle steamer Waverley heading down river from the pedestrian walkway on the Erskine Bridge in July 2012, and it is reproduced here with his permission. Built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow in 1946, the 693-ton Waverley entered service in 1947 and is the world's last sea-going paddler. She replaced the first Waverley, built in 1899 and sunk at Dunkirk in 1940, and cruised the Clyde until 1973 for Caledonian-MacBrayne. In 1974 she was sold to the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society and re-entered service in 1975. She calls regularly at Helensburgh in summer.May 13, 2016
Dandie-Dinmont-at-Hel-pier-1872-w.jpg
Dandie Dinmont71 viewsThe 197 ft iron paddle steamer Dandie Dinmont is seen berthed at Helensburgh pier in 1872. Built by A & J Inglis Ltd. at Pointhouse in Glasgow in 1866 for the Helensburgh-Ardrishaig route, but was transferred to the Forth the following year. She returned to the Clyde in 1869, but 1885 was bought by the Southsea, Ventnor, Sandown & Shanklin Steam Boat Co. After the 1900 season she was laid up, and the following year sank in Portsmouth Harbour. In 1902 she was raised and broken up in the Netherlands. Apr 28, 2016
Marmion-at-Arrochar-w.jpg
S.S. Marmion106 viewsAn early image of the Clyde paddle steamer Marmion leaving Arrochar. The 403 ton vessel was launched on May 5 1906 by A and J Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow, and placed on the Loch Goil and Arrochar service for the North British SP. She was requisitioned for mineweeping duty at Dover from 1915 as HMS Marmion II, and returned to the Clyde for the 1920 season, then was laid up for a redesign. She returned to service in 1926 as an all-year-round vessel, was reboilered in 1932, then again was requisitioned for war service. She was stationed at Harwich and survived the Dunkirk evacuations, but was sunk by enemy bombers at Harwich on the night of April 8 1941. Later she was raised and scrapped.Feb 15, 2016
PS-Redgauntlet-w.jpg
Redgauntlet320 viewsThe Clyde paddle steamer Redgauntlet saw service as a World War One minesweeper. Built by Barclay Curle in 1895 for the North British Railway, she served on the Craigendoran to Rothesay route. In August 1899 she ran on to rocks off Arran in a gale and was badly holed, but the captain ran her up the beach so that crew and passengers could be rescued. After repairs, she was moved to the Forth in 1909 and then sold to the Galloway Steam Packet Company. Later she went to Algeria and was broken up about 1934. Image circa 1925.
Jul 12, 2014
Steamers-at-Craigendoran-w.jpg
Steamers at Craigendoran568 viewsA 1933 picture of most of the LNER fleet at Craigendoran. The two which can be seen least well are the Lucy Ashton and the Jeanie Deans, while in the centre are the Talisman and the Marmion. The steamer terminal and station opened for business under the North British Railway on May 15 1882, and steamer services were finally withdrawn in 1972. The piers have since become derelict, and on the firth side of the line the station buildings are long gone.Mar 23, 2013
Lucy_Ashton,_Jeanie_Deans.jpg
Popular paddlers512 viewsA 1948 view of two of the most popular steamers at their base at Craigendoran Pier, the Lucy Ashton and the Jeanie Deans.Feb 06, 2013
PS_Talisman061.jpg
PS Talisman458 viewsThe North British steamer Talisman, built in 1896 by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow, for the Craigendoran to Rothesay route. Undertook World War One service as HMS Talla sweeping mines at Troon and Portsmouth. On refit after the war, the deck saloon was extended the full width of the hull and the bridge was moved forward of the funnel. She was on the Rothesay and Kyles of Bute service until the end of the 1934 season, and then was scrapped at Barrow. Image circa 1920.Dec 31, 2012
PS-Kenilworth-w.jpg
PS Kenilworth472 viewsA 390-ton paddle steamer built in 1898 by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse for the North British Steam Packet Company, she operated on the Clyde until 1937, serving initially on the Craigendoran to Rothesay route. She was refurbished and reboilered in 1915 and saw limited World War One service from 1917-19 as a minesweeper on the South Coast. Upon her return she reopened the Arrochar excursion service. Retired in 1937, she was broken up the following year at the yard where she had been constructed.Dec 08, 2012
First_PS_Waverley032.jpg
The first PS Waverley561 viewsThe first paddle steamer Waverley, built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow, in 1899, was bombed and sunk at Dunkirk on May 30 1940 — the 41st anniversary of her launch date — as HMS Waverley, and 350 officers men lost their lives. The 537 ton North British Steam Packet Company vessel was purchased in 1902 by the North British Railway and in 1923 by the London and North Eastern Railway. This image, date unknown, shows her off Helensburgh.Nov 20, 2012
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Rhu Pier staff362 viewsStaff and passengers wait at Rhu Pier. Image date unknown.Sep 26, 2012
Waverley-at-Craigendoran~0.jpg
Waverley at Craigendoran366 viewsThe steamer Waverley at Craigendoran pier in 1968, with part of the Caledonia in view. Built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow in 1946, the 693-ton Waverley entered service in 1947 and is the world's last sea-going paddler. She replaced the first Waverley, built in 1899 and sunk at Dunkirk in 1940, and cruised the Clyde until 1973 for Caledonian-MacBrayne. In 1974 she was sold to the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society and re-entered service in 1975. She calls regularly at Helensburgh in summer.Sep 26, 2012
Waverley_Old_LNER~0.jpg
The first Waverley592 viewsThe first paddle steamer Waverley, built by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow, in 1899, was bombed and sunk at Dunkirk on May 30 1940 — the 41st anniversary of her launch date — as HMS Waverley, and 350 officers men lost their lives. The 537 ton North British Steam Packet Company vessel was purchased in 1902 by the North British Railway and in 1923 by the London and North Eastern Railway. Image date unknown.Jun 27, 2012
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