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Last additions - Transport — Steamers
PS_Columba11.jpg
PS Columba630 viewsBuilt in 1878 by J. & G.Thomson at Clydebank, the 602-ton Columba is regarded as the most famous and luxurious Clyde steamer. An early steel-hulled vessel and at 301 feet, the largest Clyde steamer of her time, she operated the Glasgow to Ardrishaig service as part of MacBraynes 'Royal Route' to Oban. Reboilered in 1900, she was sold after the 1935 season, and broken up at Dalmuir. She is pictured off Gourock. Image date unknown.Dec 24, 2007
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PS Waverley581 viewsBuilt by A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow in 1946, the 693-ton Waverley entered service in 1947 and is the world's last sea-going paddler. She replaced the previous Waverley, built in 1899 and sunk at Dunkirk in 1940, she cruised to all parts of the Clyde Estuary until withdrawn after the 1973 season by Caledonian-MacBrayne. Next year she was sold to the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society after a massive public campaign in Scotland, and re-entered service in 1975 with support from local authorities. She calls regularly at Helensburgh during the summer. She is pictured at Gourock in 1970.Dec 24, 2007
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TS Duchess of Argyll803 viewsThe 593-ton turbine steamer Duchess of Argyll was built by William Denny & Brothers at Dumbarton in 1906 for the Ardrossan to Arran run. Requisitioned as a transport ship in World War One, she returned to service in the 1919 season, making the Kyles of Bute and Arran run her own. She moved to the long cruises to Inveraray and Campbeltown in 1936, returned to the Kyles of Bute run after the war, and was sold in 1952 to the Admiralty for experimental work at Portland. She was scrapped at Newhaven in 1970. Dec 24, 2007
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PS Lucy Ashton694 viewsThe Lucy Ashton approaches Barremman Pier at Clynder. She operated the Craigendoran - Gareloch - Greenock service from the early 1900s until she was withdrawn during the Second World War. The pier was built about 1887 on the instructions of Robert Thom, owner of Barremman Estate, and demolished in 1967.Dec 23, 2007
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DEPV Talisman673 viewsBuilt in 1935 by A. & J.Inglis, Pointhouse, Glasgow, for the London & North Eastern Railway, this 544-ton diesel-electric direct drive paddle steamer was used on year-round runs from Craigendoran to Rothesay and the Kyles of Bute. She saw World War Two service as HMS Aristocrat, including acting as a HQ ship at the Normandy landings. After 1953 she was allocated to the Wemyss Bay - Largs - Millport ferry route. She was withdrawn after the 1966 season and broken up for scrap at Dalmuir in 1967.Dec 23, 2007
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PS Lucy Ashton661 viewsThe 271-ton Lucy Ashton was launched on May 24 1888 by T.B.Seath at Rutherglen. She began on the Holy Loch run but later became more familiar on the Gareloch service from Craigendoran. She remained on the Clyde throughout both world wars. Pictured in 1947 after her post-war refurbishment, she made her last run in February 1949. Her stripped down hull saw further experimental use by the British Shipbuilding Research Association, including being fitted with a jet engine.Dec 23, 2007
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PS Jeanie Deans946 viewsThe paddle steamer Jeanie Deans was built by Fairfield at Govan and launched in 1931, then extensively refitted after war service. She remained a passenger favourite on cruises from Craigendoran until the end of the 1964 season. The next year she went to the Thames and was renamed 'Queen of the South'. She was broken up in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1967.Dec 23, 2007
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PS Jeanie Deans1006 viewsThe paddle steamer Jeanie Deans in Loch Long. Built by Fairfield at Govan and launched in 1931, she was extensively refitted after war service. She remained a passenger favourite on cruises from Craigendoran until the end of the 1964 season. The next year she went to the Thames and was renamed 'Queen of the South'. She was broken up in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1967.Dec 23, 2007
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PS Maid of the Loch630 viewsThe 555 ton Maid of the Loch was the last paddle steamer built in Britain, and the last of a long line of Loch Lomond steamers beginning about 1816. Built by A. & J.Inglis of Glasgow, she was dismantled, shipped by rail to Balloch where the sections were reassembled, and launched on March 5 1953. Her last commercial sailing was in August 1981, and now she is looked after at Balloch Pier — where this picture was taken in 1968 — by the Maid of the Loch Preservation Society.Dec 22, 2007
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PS Marmion648 viewsLaunched on May 5 1906 at A. & J.Inglis at Pointhouse, Glasgow, the 403 ton Marmion was used on the Arrochar and Loch Goil service for the North British Steam Packet Company. She was requisitioned for mineweeping at Dover from 1915 as HMS Marmion II, and returned to regular Clyde service in 1926. Again she was requisitioned for war service, stationed at Harwich. After surviving the Dunkirk evacuation, she was sunk by enemy bombers at Harwich on the night of April 8 1941 and was later raised and scrapped.Dec 22, 2007
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PS Jeanie Deans945 viewsThe paddle steamer Jeanie Deans in British Railways livery, between nationalisation in 1948 and the transfer to the Caledonian Steam Packet Company in 1951. Built by Fairfield at Govan and launched in 1931, she was extensively refitted after war service. She remained a passenger favourite on cruises from Craigendoran until the end of the 1964 season. The next year she went to the Thames and was renamed 'Queen of the South'. She was broken up in Antwerp, Belgium, in 1967.Dec 21, 2007
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Loch Lomond steamer791 viewsA Loch Lomond steamer, possibly the SS Prince George, meets the train at Balloch Pier, circa 1917.Dec 06, 2007
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