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Tribute to John Johnston

Iain Hope penned this tribute to his brother-in-law, Helensburgh Heritage Trust company secretary and treasurer John Johnston, who died on October 5 2012.

JOHN JOHNSTON first came to live in Helensburgh in 1945 when his parents, Jack and Muriel Johnston, chose to move their young family from the London area to his father’s ancestral town.

Last Updated ( Saturday, 08 December 2012 14:01 )

 

Memories of Charles Rennie Mackintosh

This article, believed to have been written by Walter W.Blackie about 1943, was originally published in the Scottish Art Review XI, No.4, 1968, by permission of Miss Agnes A.C.Blackie who found it among her father’s papers. It is published here by kind permission of two of the author's grand-daughters, Kathleen A.Salzberg and Ruth Currie, who kindly supplied the images from the family collection.

IN the early spring of 1902 my wife and I, having decided to leave Dunblane where we had lived for some seven years, were fortunate enough to happen on the site at the crown of the hill in Upper Helensburgh where ‘The Hill House’ now stands. We took the feu, and decided to build.

Last Updated ( Saturday, 23 November 2013 18:39 )

The story of Helensburgh's piers

A MASTERPLAN was proposed in 2012 for future development of the area around Helensburgh pier. It is an area which features heavily in the history of the burgh.

Around the time that Helensburgh came into being, there seem to have been several landing places in the vicinity, if not actually proper piers.

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 21 November 2012 14:31 )

Degaussing led to romance

STORIES from World War Two usually feature bravery or tragedy, but for an unemployed Helensburgh girl enlisting was to result in romance.

Today, at the age of 98, in very good health, and living in Cambridge with her daughter Linda, Marion Reilly still treasures memories of her wartime work on degaussing at Helensburgh pier, through which she met the man who was to become her husband.

Last Updated ( Monday, 20 January 2014 19:14 )

The Hill House was his vision

HELENSBURGH is full of attractive mansions designed by leading Scottish architects — but the one which attracts thousands of visitors from all over the world is Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s iconic The Hill House.

Today the large grey building at the top of Upper Colquhoun Street — described as “universally regarded as Mackintosh’s finest domestic creation” — is the property of and run by the National Trust for Scotland and is open to the public daily from April 1 to October 31.

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 17 October 2012 16:15 )

Dynasty includes smugglers, playwright

A YOUNG couple emigrated to the United States from Helensburgh in the 1890s . . . and founded a dynasty which included several smugglers and is now spearheaded by a playwright.

He is Isaac Rathbone, whose World War One tragic comedy ‘Captain Ferguson’s School for Balloon Warfare’ was performed in the 2012 Edinburgh Festival Fringe.

Last Updated ( Saturday, 13 October 2012 13:53 )

Dispelling a stereotype

Book review by Malcolm Baird of 'The three dimensions of John Logie Baird' by Douglas Brown, published by the Radio Society of Great Britain.

John Logie Baird died in 1946, but television historians are still divided about his contributions.

Last Updated ( Tuesday, 26 February 2013 17:43 )

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2014-15 Winter Talks

The 2014-15 series of Winter Talks begins on Wednesday September 24 2014 at 7.30pm in the upstairs meeting room at Helensburgh Tennis Club with a talk on the heritage aspects of the CHORD project in Colquhoun Square, Helensburgh.

Non-members are always welcome, and tea and coffee is served at the end of the meeting.